Dave Hockaday WB4IUY, Youngsville NC USA FM05
Zenith Trans-Oceanic H500

Broadcast Receivers @ WB4IUY/AC4QD

I also enjoy collecting & restoring old Broadcast receivers. I have several that I've collected since I was around 14 years old (since 1974). I'll attempt to document these in the coming days on this page.

I've collected an old phonograph with a catus needle stylus, Atwater-Kent receivers on both open chassis and with a Cathedral Cabinet, old wooden cabinet rigs, portable radios, etc. I'm just a sucker for old radio gear...period!

Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500

This was considered by Zenith to be one of their 'Long Range Radio Receivers'. I got this portable 'Spy Radio' from the junk pile at a local TV shop back in 1974. I used it as a project in my electronics class at school, learning how to test & replace resistors and capacitors, use the signal generator to align the receiver, repair the damaged air variable tuning cap, test tubes, etc. It was a very educational project for me. My father took an interest in the project and restored the enclosure to like new condition.

This portable radio was tube type, using the low voltage tubes like 1U5, 3V4, ect. It could be powered by a pair of batteries... a "A" battery for the filaments, and a "B" battery for the high voltage. It was a popular "Spy Radio" suitcase design that was seen in the 50's. This particular receiver was built in 1951.

This radio has a huge telescopic antenna that is housed in the case. it also has a loop-type antenna, seen in one of these photos, called a 'Wave-Magnet'. The Wave-Magnet was equipped with a pair of suction cups to allow it to be removed from the cover and remoted to a nearby window glass. The band selection was a push-button design, and the receiver spanned from the AM broadcast band up through a little over 18 mhz. The band switched were labeled to direct a person as to what the best time of day would be for a particular band.

There are several Zenith Trans-Oceanic resources on the internet. One of the better sites I've found is the Trans-Oceanic Resource Library found at: www.transoceanic.nostalgiaair.org. Information specifically for this H-500 I have can be seen HERE.

Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500 Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500 Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500 Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500 Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500 Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500 Zenith Trans-Oceanic H-500

Zenith Trans-Oceanic Royal 3000-1

The Zenith Trans-Oceanic series first became transistorized in 1958 with the Royal Series-1000 models. This unit is the 3000-1, and was manufactured in 1964.

This radio is clean and complete, and was originally owned by my father-in-law and WWII Infantry VET, J.W. Gardner of Wilson NC. This radio is very heavy, despite being solid state, and built to take abuse. There is a Zenith Wave-Magnet antenna built into the upper case for LF operation, and a long telescopic antenna built into the carrying handle for medium and shortwave reception.

There are several Zenith Trans-Oceanic resources on the internet. One of the better sites I've found is the Trans-Oceanic Resource Library found at: www.transoceanic.nostalgiaair.org. Information specifically for this Royal 3000-1 I have can be seen HERE.

Zenith Trans-Oceanic Royal 3000-1 Zenith Trans-Oceanic Royal 3000-1 Zenith Trans-Oceanic Royal 3000-1 Zenith Trans-Oceanic Royal 3000-1

Unknown Amplifier

This is an old audio amp... I'm still digging for documentation on this one...

Unknown Broadcast receiver

'Radio Craftsmen' Broadcast receiver

This is a beautiful rig inside... polished chrome chassis, clean parts layout, etc. The Radio Craftsmen company manufactured this back around 1951. They had a small line of equipment, including a matching audio amp, a phonograph, and even an open chassis TV set.

Craftsman Broadcast receiver


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